Charter Schools—a Teacher’s View

Imran Omer's Blog

Charter Schools—a Teacher’s View

Published onSeptember 22, 2018 onGoodreadsandBlogspot

A few days ago I was talking to a friend, who has been a teacher for more than thirty years, in both public and charter school systems. Because she was only licensed to teach art, and because art (unfortunately) is a very low priority in most school systems, she was displaced due to the lack of funds. The next job she found was in a charter school. I remember how she had complained about the public school system, but her complaints about the charter schools went far beyond her complaints about the public school system. She said, “They expect me to get to work at 7:35 am, and be on school grounds even before students appeared at the door. Then they want me to teach four 75-minute classes daily, and be present in the lunch room with the…

View original post 485 more words

Art Education? Why?

Imran Omer's Blog

The above question is an important one for a society in which there is much to be done toward the appreciation and teaching of art. Is it really a waste of time for our students? Is it a subject that just tears them away for forty-five to fifty minutes from their core subjects? Or is it a subject that provides our students with some specific skills? You may say that as an Art teacher I am biased, but I firmly believe that art should be an integral part of our school system.

students' art

Art Creates Understanding
Art preceded writing. Though essential, writing is usually linear (except perhaps in literature), while art has offered multi-layer perceptions since its very inception. The cave paintings were not only paintings they represented stories and icons, and desires and ambitions. They were a communion with nature and showed fear of it. They were inspirations and dreams…

View original post 603 more words

NATRAJA (The Lord of Dance) in The Art Institute of Chicago

Among these three representations of Shiva in The Art Institute of Chicago, Natraja is the most significant. One’s attention is drawn not only to its form but also to the symbolism it contains. This piece of sculpture is from the Chola Dynasty that ruled southern India from 800 to 1279 C.E. It is a brilliant icon and probably one of the best representations of Hindu art.

Our Environment and Teachings of Buddhism

In Buddhism, Nature is not merely a supply source for our material needs. The Earth is seen as a living entity, and therefore Nature has a dynamic role in our lives. This respect for nature is inherent in Buddhism not only because it is the basis for much of its teachings, but because Buddhism itself is a product of Nature.

Urbanization in the Developing World

The trend of rural populations moving toward cities has created huge problems in the urban societies of developing countries. In the year 2005, half of the world’s population was living in urban areas. In 1994, there were fourteen mega-cities (the cities that had at least ten million inhabitants). This number increased to thirty-seven in 2017. This migration of rural population to cities has created huge problems.

Art Education? Why?

Art Education? Why? This question is an important one for a society in which there is much to be done toward the appreciation and teaching of art. Is it really a waste of time for our students? Is it a subject that just tears them away for forty-five to fifty minutes from their core subjects? Or is it a subject that provides our students with some specific skills?